Laura Sharman 13 November 2020

People with learning disabilities six times more likely to die from COVID-19

People with learning disabilities six times more likely to die from COVID-19 image

People with a learning disability were up to six times more likely to die from COVID-19 in the first wave of the pandemic than the general population, a report has found.

The Public Health England study also found the death rate for younger adults with learning disabilities was 30 times higher than those without disabilities.

A third of those with learning disabilities who died from coronavirus between 21 March and 5 June were living in residential care.

Professor John Newton, director of health improvement at Public Health England, said: ‘It is deeply troubling that one of the most vulnerable groups in our society suffered so much during the first wave of the pandemic. We must do everything possible to prevent this happening again.

’There are now regular tests in care homes to make sure cases of coronavirus can be quickly identified and isolated, even if people do not recognise the symptoms themselves.’

The report said people with learning disabilities are more likely to have other physical health problems that can increase their risk of dying from COVID-19. It also said people with learning disabilities are likely to have difficulty recognising symptoms of COVID-19, or following government advice around infection prevention and control.

Kathryn Smith, chief executive at the Social Care Institute for Excellence, said: 'It is devastating to read about the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on people with learning disabilities. The pandemic has continued to highlight the long-standing inequalities in society and particularly for those people accessing social care.

'This has been shown across care services, from direct exposure to the virus through to the unintended consequences of loneliness, isolation and mental health problems; as well as with the previous issues with accessing appropriate PPE and testing.'

Have social services been negligent? image

Have social services been negligent?

Saara Idelbi and Conor Monighan consider the liability of local authorities in negligence where it is argued that social services should have intervened more quickly to remove children from their family homes.
SIGN UP
For your free daily news bulletin
Highways jobs

Apprentice Stonemason

City of York Council
£12.656 per annum
Do you want to pursue a career in Stonemasonry and work on York’s City walls a nationally-important monument? York, North Yorkshire
Recuriter: City of York Council

Apprentice Project Support Assistant

City of York Council
£12,656.10
Looking for a new challenge or your first steps along your career?  Your next adventure starts here!  York, North Yorkshire
Recuriter: City of York Council

Executive Support Officer

City of York Council
https
City of York Council
Recuriter: City of York Council

Development and Flood Risk Officer

Essex County Council
Up to £141.50 per day + PAYE
Development and Flood Risk Officer Temporary, Full Time £141.50 per day PAYE Location
Recuriter: Essex County Council

Cleaning Assistant

Chelmsford City Council
Grade 2 - £17,715 per annum
Riverside Leisure Centre is Chelmsford City Council’s flagship leisure facility, offering a variety of sporting activities where there is something... Chelmsford, Essex
Recuriter: Chelmsford City Council

Public Property

Latest issue - Public Property News

This issue of Public Property examines how how flexible workspaces can lead the way in regeneration for local authorities, Why local authority intervention is key to successful urban regeneration schemes and if the Government’s challenge of embracing beauty is an opportunity for communities.

The March issue also takes a closer look at Blackburn with Darwen Council's first digital health hub to help people gain control over health and care services.

Register for your free digital issue