Thomas Bridge 24 June 2014

Pay Living Wage to one million more workers, commission says

Pay Living Wage to one million more workers, commission says image

Providing the Living Wage to one million more workers by 2020 should be a Government priority, a commission of businesses and anti-poverty groups claim.

The Living Wage Commission said the cost of raising pay for almost 500,000 public sector workers to £7.65 and hour - £8.80 in London – could be met by higher tax revenues and lower in work benefits provided to private sector employees also bought up to the Living Wage.

Local government should support uptake of the Living Wage by ensuring it always procures on value and gives stronger consideration to contractors paying a Living Wage, the Commission’s final report said.

However, it also warned against across the board compulsory requirements which could disproportionately affect small and medium sized businesses from winning public sector contracts.

Chairman of the Living Wage Commission, Archbishop of York, Dr John Sentamu, said: ‘Working and still living in poverty is a national scandal. For the first time, the majority of people in poverty in the UK are now in working households.

‘The campaign for a Living Wage has been a beacon of hope for the millions of workers on low wages struggling to make ends meet.

‘If the Government now commits to making this hope a reality, we can take a major step towards ending the strain on all of our consciences. Low wages equals living in poverty.’

Responding to the report, John Allan, national chairman of the Federation of Small Businesses, said: ‘The Living Wage is a great aspirational goal, but not every business is in a position to offer it to all their staff.

‘While more than half of small firms pay their employees the living wage or above, some businesses in retail, hospitality and social care, will struggle to pay more. As the Commission says, it must remain a voluntary goal, for example not becoming a requirement in public procurement contracts.’

SIGN UP
For your free daily news bulletin
Highways jobs

Director of Public Health 

West Sussex County Council
£130,000 plus relocation expenses
We are seeking candidates with a strong commitment to make a real and positive difference to the lives of our residents, communities and businesses. Chichester, West Sussex
Recuriter: West Sussex County Council

Director of Finance

South Ribble Borough Council & Chorley Council
£75,000 plus relocation package and excellent benefits.
As a key part of our Lancashire community we’re still transforming the way we work. Lancashire
Recuriter: South Ribble Borough Council & Chorley Council

LAC Clinical Psychologist or Systemic Psychotherapist (Part Time)

Barnet London Borough Council
£47,841 - £52,886 Pro Rata
An exciting career opportunity has arisen for a part time (2 days – hours and days are negotiable) enthusiastic and... Colindale, London (Greater)
Recuriter: Barnet London Borough Council

Development Manager (Basing View, Leisure Park and Commercial)

Basingstoke & Deane Borough Council
£58,487 to £62,324
If you’ve the drive and vision to play a key role in Basingstoke’s dynamic growth story, this could be the new challenge you’ve been waiting for. Basingstoke, Hampshire
Recuriter: Basingstoke & Deane Borough Council

Fostering Social Worker - Support and Supervision North West

North Yorkshire County Council
£30,451 - £35,745
An exciting opportunity has become available within the North West Fostering service. Northallerton, North Yorkshire
Recuriter: North Yorkshire County Council

Public Property

Latest issue - Public Property News

This issue of Public Property examines how how flexible workspaces can lead the way in regeneration for local authorities, Why local authority intervention is key to successful urban regeneration schemes and if the Government’s challenge of embracing beauty is an opportunity for communities.

The March issue also takes a closer look at Blackburn with Darwen Council's first digital health hub to help people gain control over health and care services.

Register for your free digital issue