William Eichler 26 April 2019

DWP pursues 80,000 carers for overpaid allowances

DWP pursues 80,000 carers for overpaid allowances  image

The Government is pursuing thousands of carers for repayment of overpaid care allowances despite not knowing the impact this will have, auditors say.

The Department for Work and Pensions pays £66.15 a week in Carer’s Allowance to people who earn less than £123 a week and provide at least 35 hours of care a week to someone who receives a qualifying disability benefit.

On occasion, carers are overpaid or underpaid because of either an error or, in the case of overpayments, fraud.

The National Audit Office, responding to concerns raised by MPs, has carried out an investigation into the level of overpayments and repayments being made by the DWP and carers.

The report revealed that the DWP is detecting ‘significantly more’ Carer’s Allowance overpayments than has generally been the case over the past half a decade.

The department detected 93,000 overpayments in 2018-19 compared with an average of 41,000 a year detected in the previous five years due to an increase in staffing levels and new systems.

The audit also found that the DWP is seeking more repayments from carers for overpayments of Carer’s Allowance.

The Department for Work and Pensions aims to recover around £150m from carers where it is deemed the carer was at fault for an overpayment over £65.

It is looking for repayments from just under 80,000 carers for overpayments detected in the years up to now.

Just over half of these debts are under £1,000. However, there were 133 individuals with outstanding debts of over £20,000.

The DWP takes the money back by reducing benefits although legislation caps the amount that carers have to repay each week.

According to the NAO investigation, the DWP does not know how these repayments affect carers or the disabled person they care for.

Maintaining performance image

Maintaining performance

The 15 strongest performing councils in adult social care have been highlighted in IMPOWER’s latest productivity INDEX. Ralph Cook looks at the results.
Revolutionising mental health image

Revolutionising mental health

Cllr Jasmine Ali explains how Southwark Council is putting plans into action to revolutionise children’s mental health in Southwark.
SIGN UP
For your free daily news bulletin
Highways jobs

Senior Applications Analyst

Camden London Borough Council
£40,829 to £47,360
Looking for someone with at least two years’ experience providing technical support for HR and Financial Systems and... Camden, London (Greater)
Recuriter: Camden London Borough Council

AMHP Duty Manager

Camden London Borough Council
£40,829 - £47,360 per annum
Seeking to recruit a strong, highly motivated Duty Manager working for the AMHP servicein the  London Borough of Camden. Camden, London (Greater)
Recuriter: Camden London Borough Council

Housing Needs Reviews Caseworker

Camden London Borough Council
£33,122 - £38,423
The successful candidate will carry out statutory reviews of decisions under the Housing Act 1996, as amended by the Homeless Reduction Act 2018. Camden, London (Greater)
Recuriter: Camden London Borough Council

Short Breaks Assessor - Children and Young People Disability Service (CYPDS)

Camden London Borough Council
£30,066 - £34,538 per annum (subject to experience)
To be successful you will need extensive demonstrable experience working with people with various disabilities or other potentially... Camden, London (Greater)
Recuriter: Camden London Borough Council

Social Worker - Children and Young People Disability Service (CYPDS)

Camden London Borough Council
£36,630 - £42,490 per annum (subject to experience)
The service works closely with colleagues from Health, Education, Schools and Adult Social Care to support young people as they move into adulthood. Camden, London (Greater)
Recuriter: Camden London Borough Council

Public Property

Latest issue - Public Property News

This issue of Public Property examines how public sector organisations can unlock the hidden value in their land, and why a new approach to construction could help boost the outcomes of the Government’s One Public Estate programme.

The December issue also considers why learnings from ancient cities could provide the key to promoting wellbeing in the modern built environment. It also contains a case study on how the London Borough of Westminster has provided high quality care for the elderly alongside a block of luxury apartments.

Register for your free digital issue