Laura Sharman 23 November 2017

Budget 2017: Sector blasts lack of social care funding

Budget 2017: Sector blasts lack of social care funding image

More older and disabled people will fail to get the help they need due to a lack of extra funding for social care in yesterday’s Budget announcement, sector experts have warned.

The Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS) said it was ‘extremely disappointed’ that there was no extra funding for adult social care.

‘A lack of extra funding will also lead to an even greater toll being placed on the 6.5 million family members and other carers,’ said Margaret Willcox, president of ADASS.

‘By the end of this financial year, £6bn will have been cut from councils’ adult social care budgets since 2010 - with need for our services growing all that time.’

Action for Children also warned a lack of extra funding risked pushing services into crisis point.

Eleanor Briggs, head of policy and research at Action for Children, said: ‘We know the gap between demand and resource for children’s services is growing. Since 2010, funding has fallen by £2.4 billion while the number of child protection investigations has more than doubled. Failing to invest in early help and prevention services will only see this situation get worse, costing the Government even more in the long run.

‘But today there was silence on this situation when what we needed to see was action. If the Government is to deliver effective help for children and families, ministers must take the lead and ensure councils receive the funding they need to invest in early help and stop problems escalating to crisis point.’

Ms Willcox added that the increase in the National Living Wage would also put further pressure on the sector.

A war on pesticides? image

A war on pesticides?

With 40 councils now banning the use of Roundup over safety fears, Mark Whitehead finds out why the debate on using chemicals to kill weeds continues to rage.
Ambitious for adoption image

Ambitious for adoption

Dr Carol Homden argues the closure of the Adoption Register for England means all parts of the system must work together to ensure the best possible service to children.
Highways jobs

Solicitor/Barrister Advocate - Children’s x4

Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council
Band I, SCP 44 - 47 (£46,564 - £49,538 per annum) (£24.14 - 25.68 per hour)
A fantastic opportunity to join an exciting, dynamic, pioneering new advocate team in Sandwell. Sandwell, West Midlands
Recuriter: Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council

Solicitor/Barrister Governance Principal Business Lead

Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council
Band I, SCP 44 - 47 (£46,564 - £49,538 per annum) (£24.14 - £25.68 per hour)
A fantastic opportunity to join an exciting, dynamic, pioneering legal team in Sandwell. Sandwell, West Midlands
Recuriter: Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council

Employment Solicitor/Barrister Advocate

Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council
Band I, SCP 44 - 47 (£46,564 - £49,538 per annum) (£24.14 - £25.68 per hour)
A fantastic opportunity to join an exciting, dynamic, pioneering new advocate team in Sandwell. Sandwell, West Midlands
Recuriter: Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council

Solicitor/Barrister Advocate - Criminal

Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council
Band I, SCP 44 - 47 (£46,564 - £49,538 per annum) (£24.14 - £25.68 per hour)
A fantastic opportunity to join an exciting, dynamic, pioneering new advocate team in Sandwell. Sandwell, West Midlands
Recuriter: Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council

Transportation Planning Officer x2

Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council
Band F, SCP 26-31 (£29,636 – £33,799 per annum) (£15.36 - £17.52 per hour)
The post holders will be part of a team developing transport policy encompassing all modes of travel Sandwell, West Midlands
Recuriter: Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council

Local Government News

Latest issue - Local Goverrnemnt News

The June issue of Local Government News contains the full details of all the winning schemes in the 2019 Street Design Awards. From Children's Play to Pedestrian Environment, find out who has been recognised for their innovation and use of best practice.

This issue also explores how local government pension funds can hedge currency risk, how councils can best address the shortfall in school places, and an update on the number of authorities banning the use of Roundup over safety fears.

Register for your free magazine