William Eichler 15 February 2018

150,000 children of public sector workers ‘pushed into poverty’

150,000 children of public sector workers ‘pushed into poverty’  image

Over a hundred thousand extra children of public sector workers have been pushed into poverty due to pay restrictions and benefit cuts, trade unions say.

New TUC analysis has revealed one in seven children (550,000) living with a public sector worker in their family will be below the poverty line this April.

This is an increase of 40% since 2010.

The Trade Union Congress’ analysis found that under the Conservatives 150,000 extra children of public sector workers had fallen below the breadline because of public sector pay restrictions and in-work benefit cuts.

The research also discovered the average household income for families where both parents work in the public sector will be down around £83 a week in real terms by April 2018.

Households where one parent works in the public sector and another works in the private sector will lose on average £53 a week.

The South West (+55%) has seen the biggest increase in child poverty rates among families with a public sector worker in England, the TUC found. It’s followed by the North West (+51%) and East Midlands (+50%).

‘The Government's pay restrictions and in-work benefit cuts are causing needless hardship,’ said TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady.

‘Public servants shouldn’t have to worry about feeding or clothing their kids. But many are struggling to afford even the basics.

‘Ministers must give public sector workers the pay rise they have earned. If they don't more families will fall into poverty.’

Responding to the TUC's findings, a Government spokesperson said: 'We do not recognise these figures. The best route out of poverty is through employment, and since 2010 an extra three million more people are now in work and 600,000 fewer children are living in workless households.

'But we recognise that budgets are tight, which is why we have confirmed that the 1% public sector pay cap will no longer apply, and we’ve doubled free childcare – worth £5,000 per child each year.'

SIGN UP
For your free daily news bulletin
Highways jobs

Graduate Programme - Project Officer

London Borough of Richmond upon Thames and London Borough of Wandsworth
£25,295 per annum
Looking for talented individuals who have recently graduated to join our Graduate Development Programme working jointly for... London (Greater)
Recuriter: London Borough of Richmond upon Thames and London Borough of Wandsworth

Safeguarding Children's Manager (Service Manager) – Independent Reviewing Service

London Borough of Richmond upon Thames and London Borough of Wandsworth
£58,810 - £72,211 per annum
The successful candidate will also ensure effective performance management of the service to ensure improved outcomes for children and young people. London (Greater)
Recuriter: London Borough of Richmond upon Thames and London Borough of Wandsworth

Personal Advisor

London Borough of Richmond upon Thames and London Borough of Wandsworth
£27,690 to £33,554 per annum
Would you like to improve the outcomes for young people who have been in care? London (Greater)
Recuriter: London Borough of Richmond upon Thames and London Borough of Wandsworth

Social Worker - Children with Disabilities

Essex County Council
Negotiable
In Essex County Council we are "Serious about Social Work". Having recently won the Best Social Work Employer of the Year Award and been awarded 'Out England, Essex, Harlow
Recuriter: Essex County Council

Social Workers x 2 - CIC - Basildon

Essex County Council
£30906.0 - £42254.0 per annum + Plus Excellent Benefits Package
Diploma or Degree in Social Work, CQSW, CSS or equivalent Registration with Social Work England as Registered Social Worker Demonstrate ability in the application of SW knowledge, using emotional intelligence, analytical skills and act with confidence England, Essex, Basildon
Recuriter: Essex County Council

Public Property

Latest issue - Public Property News

This issue of Public Property examines how how flexible workspaces can lead the way in regeneration for local authorities, Why local authority intervention is key to successful urban regeneration schemes and if the Government’s challenge of embracing beauty is an opportunity for communities.

The March issue also takes a closer look at Blackburn with Darwen Council's first digital health hub to help people gain control over health and care services.

Register for your free digital issue