William Eichler 23 February 2018

Public sector workers responsible for ‘a third' of all unpaid overtime

Public sector workers responsible for ‘a third of all unpaid overtime image

Public sector employees are responsible for more than a third of all unpaid overtime despite only making up a quarter of the workforce.

Workers in the UK put in over £31.2bn worth of unpaid overtime last year, according to a TUC analysis of official statistics.

Nearly 5 million people put in an average of 7.4 hours a week in unpaid overtime — equivalent to missing out on pay averaging £6,265 each.

Public sector employees make up a quarter (25%) of total employees but produce more than a third (39%) of all unpaid overtime, the TUC found.

‘Public sector workers are more likely to work extra hours unpaid. It’s a mark of how dedicated our public servants are — and it’s kept our schools and hospitals running through years of funding cuts,’ said TUC general secretary Frances O’Grady.

‘But public service workers have also had eight years of real pay cuts, so they are being forced to do more for less. It’s time the government gave them the fully-funded pay rise they have earned.’

Commenting on the TUC analysis, UNISON assistant general secretary Christina McAnea said: ‘Public sector staff regularly work through their breaks and go home late, because they’re dedicated to the patients, students and local people who rely on them.

‘But expecting employees to work above and beyond the call of duty, day in day out, is simply not on. 

‘With staffing shortages and wages failing to rise with the cost of living, morale in our public services is already at rock bottom.

‘Overstretched and under-appreciated staff are at risk of burning out or giving up on a career in the public sector altogether. 

‘While managers need to ensure that staff work their proper hours, the government needs to give public sector workers the decent pay rise they all deserve.’

The safety of data on councillors’ personal devices image

The safety of data on councillors’ personal devices

Following the publication of the ICO data protection toolkit for local councils, Liz Page looks in detail at one of the issues highlighted: the use of councillor’s own devices being used for council work purposes.
Highways jobs

Air Quality Monitoring Project Manager

Birmingham City Council
£34,788 - £42,683
Seeking a skilled and dedicated individual with a background in environmental protection and air quality to... Birmingham, West Midlands
Recuriter: Birmingham City Council

Service Manager

Kirklees Metropolitan Council
£45,591 - £47,334
As an experienced Social Work manager you will have a proven track record in managing employees, budgets and performance. Kirklees, West Yorkshire
Recuriter: Kirklees Metropolitan Council

Transportation Engineer

Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council
£29,636 - £33,799 per annum
Applicants should hold an appropriate qualification, preferably to degree level, and have knowledge of transportation issues. Sandwell, West Midlands
Recuriter: Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council

Residential Assistant - Bridgemarsh

Essex County Council
£17675 - £20200 per annum
This is a permanent part time role for 22.5 hours a week. Essex County Council (ECC) is one of the largest and most dynamic local authorities in the U England, Essex, Chelmsford
Recuriter: Essex County Council

Team Manager - Assessment & Intervention - 3 jobs

Kirklees Metropolitan Council
£42,683 - £44,632
Looking for exceptional Team Managers with a proven track record in managing both practitioners and case related performance. Kirklees, West Yorkshire
Recuriter: Kirklees Metropolitan Council

Local Government News

Latest issue - Local Goverrnemnt News

This issue of Local Government News explores how councils can tackle modern slavery and trafficking in their supply chains, finds out more about Cambridge's first cohousing scheme and the launch of a new project to build a shared service pattern library for local government.

This issue also contains a special focus on children's services and how councils are protecting children following local safeguarding children boards being abolished.

Register for your free magazine