William Eichler 28 May 2019

‘Permitted development’ undermines local planning, council chiefs say

‘Permitted development’ undermines local planning, council chiefs say image

Local authority leaders have criticised the Government’s decision to allow homeowners and businesses to extend their properties without going through local planning departments.

Over the weekend, housing minister Kit Malthouse announced that ‘permitted development rights’ would be made permanent so that property owners would not have to battle through ‘time-consuming red tape’.

These rights, which were introduced on a temporary basis in 2014, enable anyone wanting to build an extension to do so without planning permission from their local authority.

Under the rules, homeowners can put a single-storey rear extension on their property of up to six metres for terraced or semi-detached homes or eight metres for detached homes.

‘These measures will help families extend their properties without battling through time-consuming red tape,’ said Mr Malthouse.

'By making this permitted development right permanent, it will mean families can grow without being forced to move.

‘This is part of a package of reforms to build more, better, faster and make the housing market work – and sits alongside our drive to deliver 300,000 homes a year by the mid 2020s.’

However, Cllr Martin Tett, the Local Government Association’s planning spokesman, argues that the extension of permitted development rights undermines local planning departments.

‘Permitted development rules are taking away the ability of local communities to shape the area they live in, ensure homes are built to high standards with the necessary infrastructure in place and have resulted in the potential loss of thousands of desperately-needed affordable homes,’ he said.

‘While we recognise building extensions under permitted development has been popular with homeowners, the planning process exists for a reason.’

‘We do not believe this right should be made permanent until an independent review is carried out of its impact, both on neighbouring residents and businesses, and also the capacity of local planning departments,’ he added.

SIGN UP
For your free daily news bulletin
Highways jobs

Head of Looked After Children and Vulnerable Young People

Enfield London Borough Council
Up to £89,319
 This is an exciting opportunity to lead all the services that support Enfield’s children in care and care leavers. Enfield (City/Town), London (Greater)
Recuriter: Enfield London Borough Council

Head of Communities

Kirklees Metropolitan Council
to £61,751 (pay award pending)
We are looking for an innovative and knowledgeable senior professional to join our leadership team with strong experience of working in communities... Kirklees, West Yorkshire
Recuriter: Kirklees Metropolitan Council

Economic Development Officer (Town Centres)

North West Leicestershire District Council
Band F, £29,636 - £32,878 per annum
The Economic Development Officer (Town Centres) post forms part of the Council’s Business Focus team who provide help directly to businesses. Coalville, Leicestershire
Recuriter: North West Leicestershire District Council

Educational Psychologist

Camden London Borough Council
£44,131 - £53,34
The ideal candidates will have an excellent understanding of psychological frameworks and their application in... Camden, London (Greater)
Recuriter: Camden London Borough Council

Economic Development Officer

North West Leicestershire District Council
Band F, £29,636 - £32,878
Are you interested in a challenge and want to help shape the future of North West Leicestershire? Coalville, Leicestershire
Recuriter: North West Leicestershire District Council

Public Property

Latest issue - Public Property News

This issue of Public Property examines how how flexible workspaces can lead the way in regeneration for local authorities, Why local authority intervention is key to successful urban regeneration schemes and if the Government’s challenge of embracing beauty is an opportunity for communities.

The March issue also takes a closer look at Blackburn with Darwen Council's first digital health hub to help people gain control over health and care services.

Register for your free digital issue