Mark Whitehead 02 October 2018

Partial ban on flammable cladding ‘does not go far enough’, firefighters warn

The Government has announced new measures it says will support homebuyers, get more homes built, improve building safety and create a 'Commonwealth Games legacy.'

However, the Fire Brigades Union warned that the partial ban on the future use of some flammable cladding included in the new measures did not go far enough.

The announcement from the ministry of housing, communities and local government said a 'new homes ombudsman' would support buyers facing problems and reform of the planning regulations will provide more housing.

There are plans to 'create a lasting legacy from the 2022 Commonwealth Games' and measures to improve high-rise safety.

The announcement said: 'The Government is committed to delivering 300,000 homes a year by the mid 2020s and has today announced further plans to speed up the planning system as well as make better use of land and vacant buildings to provide the homes that communities need.'

It added: 'Championing ambitious councils keen to make new garden communities a central part of their plans for housing and economic growth and have local support there will be clearer rules to give more certainty for communities when land is needed to make this a reality.

'Local authorities will also receive additional freedom to make the most of existing brownfield land and dispose of surplus land that could instead accommodate new homes.'

But FBU general secretary Matt Wrack said: 'This is not the outright ban on combustible cladding that firefighters have been calling for.

'The Westminster Government continues to allow cladding of limited combustibility for any building work in the future. The FBU called for a universal ban on these flammable materials.

'These measures do not deal with the existing cladding on nearly 500 buildings across England where people live and work every day.'

For more on the partial ban on cladding visit The MJ (£).

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