William Eichler 28 November 2018

Council abandons controversial plan to drop kerbside plastic collection

Council abandons controversial plan to drop kerbside plastic collection image

Swindon council has decided to abandon controversial proposals to withdraw the kerbside collection of plastics and says it will carry out further ‘research and planning’ on this issue.

The borough council will consider a series of proposals to change the way the authority manages waste over the next decade at next week’s cabinet meeting.

The new strategy, which comes at the end of a six-week consultation period that had 3,000 responses, focuses on reducing the amount of waste people produce.

It also looks at increasing recycling and making sure all waste is dealt with responsibly.

The year one plan that councillors will consider includes increased education, a policy of mandatory recycling, charges for recycling boxes and further research into plastic collections and treatment.

The council initially proposed withdrawing the kerbside collection of plastics in order to stop collecting low-grade plastic. They said that rather than being recycled it would often end up in landfill or being illegally dumped.

In response, the environment minister Therese Coffey wrote to Cllr Maureen Penny, Swindon’s cabinet member for highways and the environment, describing the idea as a ‘regressive step’.

The Government is setting all local authorities the target of recycling 50% of their waste by 2020. Swindon’s current recycling rate stands at 38% — a 12% decrease since 2010.

Commenting on the new strategy, Cllr Penny said: ‘The Waste Strategy sets out a clear ambition that in the next 10 years Swindon will become a national leader in not only recycling but also waste reduction.

‘We have listened to what people told us during our engagement exercise and over the next few months we will be doing some more work to make sure any changes we make are the right ones for Swindon and its residents.’

‘Plastics are still a big problem for us and it was made clear in the responses to our engagement that residents feel the same way,’ she continued.

‘I look forward to seeing what positive changes the Government will propose in their upcoming Waste Strategy and in the meantime I will be asking my officers to do further research and planning.’

SIGN UP
For your free daily news bulletin
Highways jobs

Service Manager - Children in Care

Pembrokeshire County Council
£46,514 - £48,412
The successful candidate will need to be able to manage a large number of competing and at times conflicting priorities, whilst... Pembrokeshire (Sir Benfro)
Recuriter: Pembrokeshire County Council

Neighbourhood Services Divisional Manager

Northumberland County Council
£60,253
You will provide professional and technical advice on all Neighbourhood Services functions. As an effective leader you will coordinate and manage... Northumberland
Recuriter: Northumberland County Council

Associate Educational Psychologist

Essex County Council
Negotiable
Essex County Council (ECC) is one of the largest and most dynamic local authorities in the UK, serving a population of 2 million residents, and has a England, Essex, Chelmsford
Recuriter: Essex County Council

Chief People Officer

Haringey London Borough Council
Up to £115k
It’s a broad and exciting role where you’ll have the chance to tackle complex, wide-scale change. Haringey, London (Greater)
Recuriter: Haringey London Borough Council

Social Work Assistant – Multi Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH)

London Borough of Richmond upon Thames and London Borough of Wandsworth
£22,377 - £23,607 per annum
As a Social Work Assistant you will be involved in contributing to assessments of children and their families, providing support and guidance to... Bexleyheath, London (Greater)
Recuriter: London Borough of Richmond upon Thames and London Borough of Wandsworth

Public Property

Latest issue - Public Property News

This issue of Public Property examines how public sector organisations can unlock the hidden value in their land, and why a new approach to construction could help boost the outcomes of the Government’s One Public Estate programme.

The December issue also considers why learnings from ancient cities could provide the key to promoting wellbeing in the modern built environment. It also contains a case study on how the London Borough of Westminster has provided high quality care for the elderly alongside a block of luxury apartments.

Register for your free digital issue