William Eichler 20 November 2015

CCTV a 'great earner' for councils claims report

CCTV a great earner for councils claims report image

The number of councils using CCTV to catch motorists committing traffic offences has risen by 76% since 2012, according to Confused.com.

New data acquired by Freedom of Information requests revealed 25 councils issued fines to drivers breaking traffic laws in 2012, compared to 44 councils who did so in 2015.

It also revealed that in the last three years motorists have been collectively fined £182,462,118 for driving infringements, such as driving in bus lanes, driving through no entry areas, stopping in yellow box junctions, going the wrong way in a one way street and committing illegal U-turns.

There are 768 active CCTV cameras being used by the local authorities to monitor traffic. Despite their pervasiveness though, the new figures show that 53% of motorists are unaware that they are used to catch drivers committing offences.

Confused.com’s revelations also show how much revenue councils are bringing in using their CCTVs.

Glasgow City Council has earned the most revenue this year from drivers with £4,000,468 coming in from traffic offences and £131,238 from Penalty Charge Notices (PCNs).

The next four authorities that are earning a lot from driving offences are all in London: Ealing Council, London Borough of Lambeth, Islington Council, and London Borough of Waltham Forest.

Matt Lloyd, head of motor insurance at Confused.com said: ‘CCTV has always been a bone of contention for many people, as people feel their privacy has been invaded. However, the main reason why councils are using these cameras is to stop motorists breaking the law. By making drivers abide by the rules of the road, our roads should become a more stress free and safer place to drive on.’

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