William Eichler 24 May 2019

Buckinghamshire unitary authority deal concluded

Buckinghamshire unitary authority deal concluded image

The Government has passed the final piece of legislation required for the formation of a new unitary authority in Buckinghamshire.

The legislation, known as the Buckinghamshire Structural Changes Order, sets out the details of the new council, which will be known as Buckinghamshire Council.

The new authority, which will begin work from April 2020, will have 147 elected members and elections to the new council will take place in May 2020.

It will replace the current five councils – Aylesbury Vale District Council, Buckinghamshire County Council, Chiltern District Council, South Bucks District Council and Wycombe District Council – which will cease to exist on 31 March 2020.

Three of these authorities – South Bucks, Chiltern and Wycombe – attempted to stop the plans going ahead due to concerns over a lack of public consent.

A temporary 236 seat shadow authority will be formed, with all current county and district councillors having a seat. Leadership will be provided by a 17 seat shadow executive of county and district members.

An implementation team, led by the county council chief executive and with a district chief executive as deputy, will be established to manage the smooth transfer of services and staff to the new council.

‘There’s no doubt that this is the biggest change in the county’s local government history, and our goal now is to use this once in a lifetime opportunity to bring the best of the current five councils together to create an even better new council for the people of Buckinghamshire,’ said a joint statement from the five Buckinghamshire councils.

‘We’re committed to working together to deliver a brand new council that will be simpler, focused on improving and supporting our communities and champion issues close to the heart of our people.’

The council leaders added that one authority would reduce duplication and running costs and therefore save money that can be invested in frontline services.

They also said the new authority would give them a ‘stronger voice’ to speak on behalf of the county at the national level.

Mobilising the social care workforce image

Mobilising the social care workforce

A continued drive towards more mobile public services is needed to help overcome social care challenges in the bleak winter months, says David McKinney.
SIGN UP
For your free daily news bulletin
Highways jobs

Social Worker - Recruitment Day

Essex County Council
£30906 - £42254 per annum
Social Worker - Recruitment DayPermanent, Full Time£30,906 - £42,254 per annumLocation
Recuriter: Essex County Council

Social Worker - Learning Disabilities & Autism Team North

Essex County Council
£30906 - £42254 per annum
Job summary and Responsibilities About the Role Working to support adults, and their families, who have complex social needs and are more vulnerab England, Essex, Clacton-On-Sea
Recuriter: Essex County Council

Commissioning Manager - SEND

Essex County Council
Up to £250 per day
Job PurposeCommissioning is a key function within ECC, working across the system to improve outcomes for Essex residents and bring about significant England, Essex, Chelmsford
Recuriter: Essex County Council

Senior CIL and S106 Officer

London Borough of Richmond upon Thames and London Borough of Wandsworth
£33,543 - £46,962
We are looking for an exceptional candidate to fill a Senior role within the Information and Planning Obligations Team. London (Greater)
Recuriter: London Borough of Richmond upon Thames and London Borough of Wandsworth

Youth Justice Liaison & Diversion Worker

Barnet London Borough Council
£34,884 - £38,883 Per Annum
An exciting career opportunity has arisen for a full time enthusiastic and energetic Youth Justice Liaison & Diversion Worker to... London (Greater)
Recuriter: Barnet London Borough Council

Public Property

Latest issue - Public Property News

This issue of Public Property examines how how flexible workspaces can lead the way in regeneration for local authorities, Why local authority intervention is key to successful urban regeneration schemes and if the Government’s challenge of embracing beauty is an opportunity for communities.

The March issue also takes a closer look at Blackburn with Darwen Council's first digital health hub to help people gain control over health and care services.

Register for your free digital issue