William Eichler 26 April 2016

Universities and charities should cooperate more for public benefit, says new study

Universities and charities should cooperate more for public benefit, says new study image

Public policy outcomes could be improved if academics and the third sector worked more closely together, argues new report.

The Carnegie UK Trust has produced a report that challenges the notion of universities as ivory towers and identifies opportunities for academics and charities to work together for the public's benefit.

Written by Professor Mark Shucksmith OBE, the report draws on findings derived from stakeholders across the UK and roundtable events in London, Edinburgh, Cardiff and Newcastle.

The publication includes a number of recommendations designed to improve interaction between universities and the third sector, including the employment of specialist knowledge exchange workers to aid communication between the worlds of social science, policy and practice.

It also suggests investing in new ways of finding spaces for academics and practitioners to exchange knowledge.

Professor Shucksmith explains: ‘The notion that universities have a monopoly on knowledge production that must be transferred out to users is outdated. Both practitioners and academic institutions are knowledge creators.

‘Universities and the third sector have a shared interest in achieving impact and have different types of knowledge and expertise that they can bring to the table. There are many mutual benefits which should encourage cooperation.’

Universities, argues Professor Shucksmith, must be more open to the public and less narrowly focused.

‘Academic institutions produce highly valued evidence but this is not always readily accessible. Measures of academic success are often too narrowly focused encouraging institutions to turn inwards and away from society,’ he said.

‘A number of universities are however already engaging in activity that involve deeper interaction and partnership working with communities and the third sector and we hope this report will act as a stepping stone for more collaborative working moving forward.’

Highways jobs

Senior Practitioner - Placement Finding Team

Essex County Council
£28500.0 - £50400.0 per annum
Senior Practitioner - Children and Young People Placement Service- Placement Finding Team Interviews to be held on the 10th September at County Hall, England, Essex, Chelmsford
Recuriter: Essex County Council

People Information Analyst

Essex County Council
Up to £33330 per annum
Please note this is a fixed term contract role for a duration of 12 months. Essex County Council (ECC) is one of the largest and most dynamic local au England, Essex, Chelmsford
Recuriter: Essex County Council

Key stage Officer

Royal Borough of Greenwich
£32430 - £34794
Key Stage Education Officer (Secondary Phase) to work with children in our care, supporting them in classrooms and in their homes with their education SE18 6HQ
Recuriter: Royal Borough of Greenwich

Solicitor/Barrister Advocate - Children’s x4

Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council
Band I, SCP 44 - 47 (£46,564 - £49,538 per annum) (£24.14 - 25.68 per hour)
To act as the principal advocate for all aspects of advocacy legal work relating to the children’s social care in the county court and high court. Sandwell Council House, Freeth Street, Oldbury B69 3DE
Recuriter: Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council

Business Support Officer

Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council
Band C, SCP 5 - 8 (£18,795 - £19,945 per annum) pro rata (£9.74 - £10.34 per hour)
The successful candidate will provide administrative business support to service teams within Adult Social Care, Health and Wellbeing. The Lyng, Health & Social Care Centre, Frank Fisher Way, West Bromwich, B70 7AW
Recuriter: Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council

Local Government News

Latest issue - Local Goverrnemnt News

The June issue of Local Government News contains the full details of all the winning schemes in the 2019 Street Design Awards. From Children's Play to Pedestrian Environment, find out who has been recognised for their innovation and use of best practice.

This issue also explores how local government pension funds can hedge currency risk, how councils can best address the shortfall in school places, and an update on the number of authorities banning the use of Roundup over safety fears.

Register for your free magazine