William Eichler 14 March 2018

Government cuts force over a million children into poverty

Government cuts force over a million children into poverty image

One and a half million more children will be in poverty by 2022 due to the Government’s austerity agenda, commission reveals.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission has today published a cumulative impact assessment of Government policy from 2010 to 2018.

Assessing how Whitehall’s reforms will affect various groups by 2021-22, the commission discovered children will be hit the hardest.

It found an extra one and a half million children will be in poverty by 2022 and households with three or more children will see large losses of around £5,600 by the same year.

The report also revealed the child poverty rate for those in lone parent households will increase from 37% to over 62% in the next four years.

The commission found households with at least one disabled adult and a disabled child will lose over £6,500 a year - over 13% of their annual income.

Lone parents will lose an average of £5,250 a year - almost one-fifth of their annual income - by 2022, and women will lose about £400 per year on average, while men will only lose £30.

Bangladeshi households will lose around £4,400 a year, in comparison to ‘White’ households, or households with adults of differing ethnicity, which will only lose between £500 and £600 on average.

The negative impacts are largely driven by changes to the benefit system, the commission reported; in particular the freeze in working-age benefit rates, changes to disability benefits, and reductions in Universal Credit rates.

‘It’s disappointing to discover that the reforms we have examined negatively affect the most disadvantaged in our society,’ said David Isaac, the chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

‘It’s even more shocking that children – the future generation – will be the hardest hit and that so many will be condemned to start life in poverty. We cannot let this continue if we want a fairer Britain.

‘We are keen to work together with government to achieve its vision of a Britain that works for everyone. To achieve this outcome it is essential that a full cumulative impact analysis is undertaken of all current and future tax and social security policies.

‘We have proved it’s possible and urge the Government to follow our lead and work with us to deliver it.’

Basic income pilots image

Basic income pilots

Gail Irvine finds out how local government in Scotland is leading the way on basic income.
Highways jobs

Change Lead, Adult Social Care & Health

London Borough of Bexley
£41,205 - £48,069
We are currently seeking an experienced Change Lead to work on our Adult Social Care Services’ transformation programme. Bexleyheath, London (Greater)
Recuriter: London Borough of Bexley

Deputy Team Manager

Brent Council
£41,847 - £44,691 p.a. inc.
An exciting opportunity has arisen in the Hospital Discharge Team (HDT) for an experienced Social Worker. Wembley, London (Greater)
Recuriter: Brent Council

Highways Estimator

Ringway
Competitive Salary
As the Highways Estimator you will join a busy environment and become an integral part of the team. Hounslow (London Borough), London (Greater)
Recuriter: Ringway

Joint Strategic Director of Commissioning 

West Sussex County Council
circa £130,000 per annum
The post holder will be able to demonstrate an understanding and embrace the opportunity to address the health... West Sussex
Recuriter: West Sussex County Council

Head of Lifelong Services

West Sussex County Council
up to £85,000 per annum
The Head of Lifelong Services will lead and deliver a new, co-produced, integrated and whole life approach and service working with people... West Sussex
Recuriter: West Sussex County Council

Local Government News

Latest issue - Local Goverrnemnt News

The December issue of Local Government News looks at the consequences a council may face if it is unable to provide statutory services, the launch of Liverpool’s housing company and how councils can best manage roles in local authority companies.

It also has a special section on green building and energy efficiency including what funding is available to enable councils to deliver heat networks and how councils can pay for ‘smart buildings’.

Register for your free magazine