William Eichler 18 July 2018

Councils could save thousands with ‘bee-friendly’ policies

Local authorities can save thousands of pounds by adopting ‘bee-friendly’ grass cutting plans, campaigners say.

Friends of the Earth and Buglife have urged councils to cut grassy areas less frequently in order to support bees.

They note that, as well as being beneficial for wildlife, this would save councils a lot of money.

Dorset County Council saves around £93,000 a year by only cutting rural road verges when needed, the campaigners found.

Burnley Borough Council estimates that it saves around £60,000 per annum from cutting back on grass-cutting to help pollinators.

Monmouthshire CC reports that their saving from a reduction in highway verge mowing is approximately £35,000 each year.

‘Councils have an important role to play in protecting our bees and other pollinators,’ said Friends of the Earth bee campaigner Nick Rau.

‘But although many local authorities are taking steps to help our under-threat bees, only a handful have so far introduced comprehensive action plans to protect them.

‘Measures such as allowing patches of grass to grow longer in parks and on road verges aren’t just good news for pollinators; they can save money for local councils too.’

Dr Annabel King, senior ecologist at Dorset County Council said: ‘We are very proud to be one of the first local authorities to produce and implement a pollinator action plan.

‘The plan is specifically aimed at helping all pollinators, including bees, butterflies and moths, numbers of which have declined severely in the last 50 years.

‘The plan has enabled us to make significant savings — we save around £93,000 a year by only cutting rural road verges when needed, allowing wildflowers and grasses to flower and set seed.

‘We also never use topsoil when creating new road verges anymore, as subsoil results in wildflower rich grass which is of greater use to pollinators and costs less to manage.

‘On the Weymouth Relief Road, this method has resulted in management costs of £500 per year, as opposed to an estimated £2,700 if the verges had been spread with topsoil.’

SIGN UP
For your free daily news bulletin
Highways jobs

Youth Offending Team Officer (Qualified)

Leicestershire County Council
£33,558
Within the principle aims of preventing offending by children and young people. Leicester, Leicestershire
Recuriter: Leicestershire County Council

Communications Manager (Improvement Journey)

Lancashire County Council
£34,373-£39,579
Lancashire County Council is changing... Could you be part of our journey? Lancashire
Recuriter: Lancashire County Council

Legal Caseworker (Children and Education) - 12 months duration

Essex County Council
£19867 - £23374 per annum + + 25 Days Leave & Defined Benefit Pension
Please note that interview will take place on the 24th August 2022. As an Anywhere (hybrid) Worker, your role will have a ECC base location, as sho England, Essex, Chelmsford
Recuriter: Essex County Council

Volunteer Services Officer

Lancashire County Council
£22,129-£25,927
Lancashire Volunteer Partnership (LVP) was set up in 2016 as a gateway into public volunteer services. Lancashire
Recuriter: Lancashire County Council

Planning Officer

The Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea Council
£32,868 - £36,579
Your work and advice will help us to put local people at the heart of everything we do. Kensington and Chelsea, London (Greater)
Recuriter: The Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea Council

Partner Content

Circular highways is a necessity not an aspiration – and it’s within our grasp

Shell is helping power the journey towards a circular paving industry with Shell Bitumen LT R, a new product for roads that uses plastics destined for landfill as part of the additives to make the bitumen.

Support from Effective Energy Group for Local Authorities to Deliver £430m Sustainable Warmth Funded Energy Efficiency Projects

Effective Energy Group is now offering its support to the 40 Local Authorities who have received a share of the £430m to deliver their projects on the ground by surveying properties and installing measures.

Pay.UK – the next step in Bacs’ evolution

Dougie Belmore explains how one of the main interfaces between you and Bacs is about to change.