Thomas Bridge 01 July 2015

Council reviews ‘no ball games’ signs in childhood obesity push

Council reviews ‘no ball games’ signs in childhood obesity push image

A London borough could scrap many of its ‘no ball games’ signs in a bid to combat childhood obesity and help youngsters play.

Haringey Council has joined with arms length management company Homes for Haringey to review all ‘no ball games’ signs in the borough as part of a new drive to boost healthy living.

While signs will be removed if they are found to be stopping youngsters from playing, the borough told LocalGov that those preventing anti-social behaviour would remain in place.

Over half of all adults and one in three 10 and 11 year olds in the north London borough are now classed as obese or overweight.

The town hall has now joined with partners including the local NHS, Homes for Haringey, the Tottenham Hotspur Foundation and local schools to reduce the local waistline.

Cllr Peter Morton, Haringey Council’s cabinet member for health and wellbeing and chair of the Haringey Obesity Alliance, said: ‘We know that the obesity problem in Haringey cannot be solved by any one agency or organisation acting alone, instead it demands close cooperation between partners in health, education, local government, business, the voluntary sector and the wider community. That’s why I’m delighted to announce the launch of the Haringey Obesity Alliance.

‘Working together I’m sure we will make great progress in reversing the rise of obesity, by encouraging healthier eating, increasing and sustaining people’s participation in sport and leisure activities, and creating a culture that makes positive lifestyle changes easier.’

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