William Eichler 22 January 2018

Blue badge reform to improve travel for people with ‘hidden disabilities’

Blue badge reform to improve travel for people with ‘hidden disabilities’

A proposed reform to the blue badge criteria could mean people with ‘hidden disabilities’ will find it easier to travel.

New plans announced yesterday by transport minister Jesse Norman could help remove barriers to travel for people with conditions such as dementia and autism.

About 2.4 million disabled people in England currently have a blue badge, allowing them to park on roads without charge and normally without time limit.

This makes mobility a lot easier. Around 75% of blue badge holders say they would go out less often if they didn’t have one.

The proposed reforms of the blue badge criteria would expand the number of people who could access this benefit, and create greater parity between the treatment of physical and mental health conditions.

‘Blue badges give people with disabilities the freedom to get jobs, see friends or go to the shops with as much ease as possible,’ said Mr Norman.

‘We want to try to extend this to people with invisible disabilities, so they can enjoy the freedom to get out and about, where and when they want.’

 
comments powered by Disqus
Sign Up