William Eichler 12 July 2018

Gap between spending per pupil in England and Wales ‘eliminated’

Gap between spending per pupil in England and Wales ‘eliminated’ image

School funding in England has fallen faster than in Wales, ‘virtually eliminating’ the gap between the two nations in school spending per pupil, financial experts reveal.

Total school spending per pupil in England fell by about 8% in real terms, while in Wales it dropped by 5%, according to a new study from the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS).

School spending in England was protected in real terms under the coalition Government (2010-15) and cut by 4% between 2015 and 2017.

However, the IFS calculated the overall cut of 8% by including the additional effects of much larger cuts to school sixth form spending per pupil (25%) and local authority spending (55%).

The cut in total school spending in Wales has also been driven by large cuts to school sixth form funding (22%) and local authority spending (38%).

The difference in funding cuts has led to the gap in school spending per pupil between England and Wales being ‘virtually eliminated’, the IFS found.

In 2017-18, total school spending per pupil in England was about £5,870 which was just 2% — or £100 per pupil — above the £5,760 seen in Wales.

‘School spending per pupil has fallen by more in England than in Wales over the last eight years, virtually eliminating the gap in spending per pupil between the two countries,’ Luke Sibieta, IFS research fellow said.

‘Policymakers in both England and Wales have chosen to protect spending directly allocated to schools for pupils under 16, and to make much larger cuts to sixth form allocations and to local authority spending.

‘Schools in England have faced the additional pressure of a fast growing pupil population, whilst numbers in Wales have remained roughly constant.’

SIGN UP
For your free daily news bulletin
Highways jobs

Social Worker - SGO & Connected Person Assessment Team

Essex County Council
Negotiable
Special Guardianship Order (SGO) & Connected Person Assessment Team The SGO and Connected Person's Assessment Team (North & Mid) first started in Apri England, Essex, Chelmsford
Recuriter: Essex County Council

Economy & Business Service Manager 

Harborough District Council
£49,350 to £52,368
Looking for an experienced manager who understands public sector responsibilities with the proven ability to deliver our ambitions. Market Harborough, Leicestershire
Recuriter: Harborough District Council

Head of Income and Financial Inclusion

The Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea Council
£48,800 - £66,000 per annum
You’ll have excellent interpersonal and communication skills, with a substantial track record of successful performance management. Kensington and Chelsea, London (Greater)
Recuriter: The Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea Council

Advanced Practitioner

The Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea Council
£33.600 - £45,400 per annum
Looking for an Advanced practitioner Social workers to join the Adult social services in the... Kensington and Chelsea, London (Greater)
Recuriter: The Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea Council

Adult Principle Social Worker

The Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea Council
£36,600 - £49,600 per annum
The successful candidate will be a passionate and skilled communicator with ability to work alongside operational Social Workers and... Kensington and Chelsea, London (Greater)
Recuriter: The Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea Council

Public Property

Latest issue - Public Property News

This issue of Public Property examines how public sector organisations can unlock the hidden value in their land, and why a new approach to construction could help boost the outcomes of the Government’s One Public Estate programme.

The December issue also considers why learnings from ancient cities could provide the key to promoting wellbeing in the modern built environment. It also contains a case study on how the London Borough of Westminster has provided high quality care for the elderly alongside a block of luxury apartments.

Register for your free digital issue