Mark Whitehead 03 March 2017

Domestic abuse victims could be allowed to vote anonymously under new proposals

Domestic abuse victims could be allowed to vote anonymously under new proposals

Survivors of domestic abuse will find it easier to register to vote anonymously under new government proposals.

The anonymous registration scheme protects people including victims of harassment or stalking, and some witnesses in criminal court cases, who would be at risk if their name and address appeared in the electoral register.

Plans announced by minister for the constitution Chris Skidmore inlcude updating the list of court and other orders that are acceptable as evidence of the risk to an applicant, and lowering the seniority required for an attestor from the police or social services.

Mr Skidmore said: 'This government is committed to removing any barriers that prevent voters from exercising their democratic right.

'Having met survivors of domestic abuse over the past six months, it is clear that the existing system has often let down those affected by domestic abuse.'

Mehala Osborne, a survivor of domestic abuse and founder of the Right to Vote campaign, said: 'I am so proud to have started the campaign that has led to these proposed changes.

'Survivors in the future will not be denied their voice and democratic right to vote.'

 
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